Rudolph Cheese Factory

RUDOLPH CHEESE FACTORY. VELVEETA CHEESE BALL.

Rudolph Cheese Factory

    rudolph

  • Rudolph or Rudolf (Rodolphe, Italian and Rodolfo) or Rodolphe is a male first name, and, less commonly, a surname. It is a Germanic name deriving from 2 stems. One being “Rod” or “Hrôdh”, meaning “fame”, and “olf” meaning “wolf” (see also Hroðulf; cf. Adolf)
  • A Front Somersault with 1½ twists; also known as a “Rudy”. Named afer Dave Roudolph who executed the 1 ½ twisting front Somersault on a trampoline in the late 1920′s in Vaudeville. Randolph and Adolph were “invented” names for the kindred skills they represent.
  • Wilma (Glodean) (1940–94), US track athlete. A runner, she was the first woman to win three track and field gold medals in one Olympics, 1960
  • was followed by two Thanksgiving specials, The Cricket on the Hearth (narrated by Danny Thomas), and Mouse on the Mayflower (told by Tennessee Ernie Ford). Videocraft also tackled Halloween with the cult favorite Mad Monster Party, (1969) featuring one of the last performances of Boris Karloff.

    factory

  • A building or group of buildings where goods are manufactured or assembled chiefly by machine
  • A factory (previously manufactory) or manufacturing plant is an industrial building where laborers manufacture goods or supervise machines processing one product into another.
  • A person, group, or institution that produces a great quantity of something on a regular basis or in a short space of time
  • An establishment for traders carrying on business in a foreign country
  • a plant consisting of one or more buildings with facilities for manufacturing
  • Lyoko is a fictional virtual world in the French animated television series Code Lyoko.

    cheese

  • A food made from the pressed curds of milk
  • A molded mass of such food with its rind, often in a round flat shape
  • used in the imperative (get away, or stop it); “Cheese it!”
  • A round flat object resembling a cheese
  • tall mallow: erect or decumbent Old World perennial with axillary clusters of rosy-purple flowers; introduced in United States
  • a solid food prepared from the pressed curd of milk

rudolph cheese factory

rudolph cheese factory – The American

The American College and University: A History
The American College and University: A History
First published in 1962, Frederick Rudolph’s groundbreaking study, The American College and University, remains one of the most useful and significant works on the history of higher education in America. Bridging the chasm between educational and social history, this book was one of the first to examine developments in higher education in the context of the social, economic, and political forces that were shaping the nation at large.
Surveying higher education from the colonial era through the mid-twentieth century, Rudolph explores a multitude of issues from the financing of institutions and the development of curriculum to the education of women and blacks, the rise of college athletics, and the complexities of student life. In his foreword to this new edition, John Thelin assesses the impact that Rudolph’s work has had on higher education studies. The new edition also includes a bibliographic essay by Thelin covering significant works in the field that have appeared since the publication of the first edition.
At a time when our educational system as a whole is under intense scrutiny, Rudolph’s seminal work offers an important historical perspective on the development of higher education in the United States.

Rudolph the Green Nosed Reindeer (Can you see him?)

Rudolph the Green Nosed Reindeer (Can you see him?)
At this festive time of year, In the woodland above Llanberis, North Wales on the return walk from Rhaedr Ceunant Mawr (waterfall), Rudolph (a green nosed version!)appeared in the midst of the trees….is it me or can you see him too??!!

Rudolph Cheese Factory

Rudolph Cheese Factory
Rudolph, Wisconsin.

rudolph cheese factory

The Original Christmas Classics [Blu-ray]
Includes 4 All Time Holiday Favorites: Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town, Frosty the Snowman, and Frosty Returns.

Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer:
This classic 1964 television special featuring Rudolph and his misfit buddies set the standard for stop-motion animation for an entire generation before Tim Burton darkly reinvented it in the early 1990s. Burl Ives narrates as Sam the Snowman, telling and singing the story of a rejected reindeer who overcomes prejudice and saves Christmas one particularly blustery year. Along the way, he meets an abundance of unforgettable characters: his dentally obsessed elf pal Hermey; the affable miner Yukon Cornelius and his motley crew of puppies; the scary/adorable Abominable Snow Monster; a legion of abandoned, but still chatty, toys; and a rather grouchy Santa. In addition to the title song that inspired it, this 53-minute tape is crammed with catchy tunes such as “Silver and Gold” and “Holly Jolly Christmas.” Those who grew up looking forward to watching Rudolph every Christmas season will undoubtedly be able to recite the quotable quotes (“I’m cuuuute. She said I’m cuuuute.” “Herbie doesn’t like to make toys.”) as well as any Casablanca cult audience. –Kimberly Heinrichs

Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town:
This 53-minute, 1970 animated film may be the most delightful of those sundry, stop-motion animated Christmas perennials that show up on television during the holidays. The clay animation production, boasting a wonderful musical score and art direction that occasionally underscores the flower-power era in which it was born, tells the story of Santa’s origins, in which Kris Kringle decides to get toys into the hands of poor children in gloomy Sombertown. Charmingly narrated by Fred Astaire and featuring voices by Mickey Rooney and Keenan Wynn, Santa Claus Is Coming to Town presents a nice bridge between two generations of entertainment, the classic and the hip. –Tom Keogh

Frosty the Snowman:
Jimmy Durante narrates this Christmas story that is based on the song of the same name. To make up for the fact that her students are in school on Christmas Eve, the local schoolteacher hires the magician Professor Hinkle to entertain the kids. Unfortunately, he’s not a very good magician. Frustrated in his attempt to pull a rabbit out of his hat, he throws it away in anger. Outside, the kids build a snowman (what to call it? Harold? Oatmeal? Frosty!), and when the hat blows onto it–Happy Birthday!–it comes to life. Professor Hinkle decides he wants the hat back so he can make money off of its newfound magical properties, but the kids want to save Frosty. When the temperature starts to rise, a new problem threatens Frosty’s existence. Karen, the leader of the children, comes up with a plan to save him: take him on a train to the North Pole, where it’s always cold. With a cameo by Santa Claus, and the promise of Frosty’s return every year, this story of life, death, and holiday cheer is glazed with the sweet frosting of hope and happiness. A true holiday classic. –Andy Spletzer

Frosty Returns:
n the same way that many a Hollywood sequel has little to do with the first film, Frosty Returns has almost nothing in common with the original Frosty the Snowman, aside from a man made of snow. The biggest difference is that this Frosty doesn’t need a magic hat to come to life. The story: In the town of Beansboro, old Mr. Twitchell has invented an aerosol spray that can remove snow without the hassle of shoveling or plows. This frightens Frosty, who enlists the help of amateur magician Holly and her friend Charles to stop the old coot. Made in 1992, Frosty Returns has an animation style that looks like a cross between the old Schoolhouse Rock and Peanuts cartoons, with voice talent that includes Jonathan Winters, Andrea Martin, Jan Hooks, Brian Doyle-Murray, and John Goodman as Frosty. The story may be divisive, pitting children against adults and a pro-snow contingent against anti-snow people, but the songs are catchy and the message is one that ultimately empowers kids. Like a hero from an old Western, this Frosty is a wanderer who leaves when his job is done so he can work his magic elsewhere. –Andy Spletzer